JetBlue, Alaska, offers fall flight deals to entice consumers during slower season

Some U.S. passenger carriers are already trying to boost demand during the slower fall season.

JetBlue Airways and Alaska Airlines offered flight sales this week, which both end on Wednesday and Thursday, for travel booked from August through early November, commonly referred to as “shoulder season.”

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Airlines typically see a drop in demand in the fall as families focus on the start of another school year. It is therefore not unusual for airlines to offer discounts on tickets during this period. Still, Clint Henderson, editor of travel website The Points Guy, told FOX Business he’s noticed even more alerts lately.

“My gut tells me it’s because the airlines got a little too aggressive with pricing over the summer and maybe scared off some consumers,” Henderson told FOX Business.

To entice travelers, JetBlue is offering to drop $25 for one-way flights. Meanwhile, Alaska has a few different deals, with one-way flights starting at just $39.

Travelers walk through Salt Lake City International Airport, Tuesday, March 9, 2021, in Salt Lake City. WE (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer/AP Newsroom)

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The sales may bring some relief to travelers after dealing with soaring ticket prices earlier this summer. In May, prices peaked, exceeding $400 on average for a round trip, nearly 50% higher than a year earlier, according to Hopper.

However, airlines have already had to cancel and delay thousands of flights this summer as the industry struggled to meet historic levels of passenger demand.

Airlines have blamed bad weather and understaffed federal air traffic controllers for many of their flight delays this summer, but part of the problem is also a shortage of workers.

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However, airlines have been working around the clock to counter these issues, including increasing hiring and training. Alaska told passengers earlier this summer it “should be back to flying a reliable, well-staffed operation” by July.

Delta CEO Ed Bastian also told analysts last month that the company had invested in measures to restore its “operational integrity, including prior boarding procedures and operational buffers.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.